Jay Pantone

Assistant Professor
Marquette University

jay.pantone@marquette.edu


MSCS 6040

Spring 2019, Marquette University

The main theme of this course is foundational linear algebra considered from a numerical viewpoint. We focus on solutions of linear systems of equations, eigenvalues and eigenvectors, and transformations. The course emphasizes and illustrates proof and numerical implementation using problems arising in applications. Multivariable calculus and linear algebra are prerequisites.

  • Lectures:
    M, W 3:30pm - 4:45pm
    Cudahy 131
  • Office Hours:
    Monday, 9:00am - 10:00am
    Cudahy 307 Tuesday, 3:00pm - 4:30pm
    Friday, 2:30pm - 4:00pm
    and by appointment

Course Information

The official syllabus is here.

 
Announcements

Textbook
Exams


LaTeX Resources

I recommend using Overleaf (free) to write your assignments in LaTeX. You can use this document as a basic template by cloning it to your own account.

Tutorials

I'm happy to help troubleshoot your LaTeX in office hours!


Important Dates
Jan 14 Classes begin
Jan 21 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, no classes
Jan 22 Last day to add/drop classes or request CR/NC option
March 4-8 Midterm exams
March 10-17 Spring break, no classes
April 12 Last day to withdraw from classes
April 18-22 Easter break, no classes
May 4 Last day of classes
TBD Math 6040 final exam

Google Calendar
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Daily Calendar
  • Topics for future dates are tentative and subject to change.
# Date Topics Homework
& Announcements
1 Mon, Jan 14 Syllabus
Start Lecture 1 (Linear Algebra Review)
There will be no office hours on Tuesday, Jan 15 or Friday, Jan 18. Office hours will resume the following week.
2 Wed, Jan 16 Continue Lecture 1 (Linear Algebra Review)
Mon, Jan 21 Martin Luther King, Jr. Day — no class
3 Wed, Jan 23 Finish Lecture 1 (Linear Algebra Review) Due Monday, January 28, by 11:59pm
Must be submitted electronically on D2L
  • T-B: 1.3
  • Demmel: 1.2
  • Read the appendix "The Definition of Numerical Analysis" in T-B, pages 321-327
Suggested Extra Problems (not collected):
  • T-B: 1.1, 1.2ab, 1.4
  • Demmel: 1.4
4 Mon, Jan 28 Lecture 2 (Orthogonal Vectors and Matrices) Due Friday, February 1, by 11:59pm
Must be submitted electronically on D2L
  • T-B: 2.3
Suggested Extra Problems (not collected):
  • T-B: 2.1, 2.2, 2.4, 2.6
5 Wed, Jan 30 Finish Lecture 2
6 Mon, Feb 4 Lecture 3 (Norms) Due Monday, February 11, by 3:30pm
Must be submitted electronically on D2L
  • T-B: 3.2, 3.5
Suggested Extra Problems (not collected):
  • T-B: 3.1, 3.3
7 Wed, Feb 6 Lecture 4 (SVD, part 1)
Matlab Matrix Tutorial
Plotting Demo (created by Sarah Hamilton)
Due Wednesday, February 13, by 3:30pm
Must be submitted electronically on D2L
  • T-B: 4.1, 4.3
    Note: For 4.1, do not use a computer / calculator, and do not try to perform the calculations from the proof of Theorem 4.1. Instead, just think about the idea that the matrix \(A\) turns circles into ellipses, and that when we write \(A = U \Sigma V^*\), that means the circle -> ellipse transformation involves first a rotation/reflection (\(V^*\)), then a stretching along the axes (\(\Sigma\)), and finally a rotation/reflection back into place (\(U\)).

    For 4.3, refer to the posted Matlab tutorials, and feel free to search online for other tutorials about how to plot points, lines, and vectors. You should use the "svd" function in Matlab to compute the SVD. You will submit your code to me (either a .m file or a .mlx file) on D2L and a pdf of its output.
Suggested Extra Problems (not collected):
  • practice more Matlab!
8 Mon, Feb 11 Lecture 5 (SVD, part 2) Due Monday, February 18, by 3:30pm
Must be submitted electronically on D2L
  • T-B: 5.3(a)-(d)
  • Use this Matlab code to apply the SVD to some images to compress them. Play around with using different ranges of singular values.
  • Find a photograph (an actual photograph, not a computer generated image) online that you think the SVD will compress particularly well. Find one you think it will compress particularly poorly. Explain your reasoning, then test your hypotheses and send me the results. Look at the singular values for your images and say whether you think they back up your conclusions. You can submit a pdf with your results, or a Matlab Live (.mlx) file which lets you link your code and output together in one file.
Suggested Extra Problems (not collected):
  • practice more Matlab!
9 Wed, Feb 13 Lecture 6 (Projectors) No homework today! Spend a few minutes playing around in Matlab.
10 Mon, Feb 18 Finish Lecture 6 (Projectors)
Lecture 7 (QR Decomposition)
Due Monday, February 25, by 3:30pm
Must be submitted electronically on D2L
  • T-B: 6.4
    After doing the short(!) computation, try to put your answer in a complete sentence—something like "\(P =\) ... is the ... that ...".
  • Prove the following fact from lecture: Let \(w\) be any vector, not necessarily with unit length. Then, \(P = \displaystyle\frac{ww^*}{w^*w}\) is an orthogonal projector onto \(\operatorname{span}\{w\}\).
Suggested Extra Problems (not collected):
  • T-B: 6.1, 6.2, 6.3
11 Wed, Feb 20 Finish Lecture 7 (QR Decomposition)
Lecture 8 (Gram-Schmidt Orthogonalization)
Due Wednesday, February 27, by 3:30pm
Must be submitted electronically on D2L
  • T-B: 7.1(a), 7.5(b)
Suggested Extra Problems (not collected):
  • T-B: 7.1(b), 7.5(a)
12 Mon, Feb 25 Finish Lecture 8 (Gram-Schmidt Orthogonalization) Due Monday, March 4, by 3:30pm
Must be submitted electronically on D2L
  • T-B: 8.2. Use your algorithm to compute the reduced QR decomposition of the two matrices from Exercise 6.4, and submit the code and results. (I recommend trying out a .mlx file.)
  • Read Lecture 9 (in T-B) about Matlab, and try Experiments 1 and 3 on your computer. This section will help you understand how to manipulate vectors and matrices and will give you an introduction to some of the numerical stability concepts we will encounter soon. You don't have to turn in anything for this question.
Suggested Extra Problems (not collected):
  • Demmel: 3.1
13 Wed, Feb 27 Lecture 11 (Least Squares Problems) Due Wednesday, March 6, by 3:30pm
Must be submitted electronically on D2L
  • T-B: 11.3 (skip (c)). Note that "\" in Matlab solves systems of the form \(Ax=b\). Use it for Steps 3 and 4 in Algorithm 11.1. You may also use the function "chol" to compute the Cholesky factorization.
Suggested Extra Problems (not collected):
  • Demmel: 3.11
14 Mon, Mar 4 Lecture 12 (Conditioning and Condition Numbers) No assignment.
15 Wed, Mar 6 In-class Midterm Exam
Take-home Exam Assigned
Covers up to and including Lecture 11.
Mon, Mar 11 Spring Break — no class
Wed, Mar 13 Spring Break — no class
16 Mon, Mar 18 Finish Lecture 12
Lecture 13 (Floating Point Arithmetic)
No assignment.
17 Wed, Mar 20 Take-home Exam Due
18 Mon, Mar 25
19 Wed, Mar 27
20 Mon, Apr 1
21 Wed, Apr 3
22 Mon, Apr 8
23 Wed, Apr 10
24 Mon, Apr 15
25 Wed, Apr 17
Mon, Apr 22 Easter Break — no class
26 Wed, Apr 24
27 Mon, Apr 29
28 Wed, May 1